Category Archives: MicroArchitecture

SHAC 10 sq metre Challenge Judging Criteria

  

How are we going to live well, with purpose, and with less reliance on resources like materials and energy?

The SHAC Challenge is a way to learn about the building code, experiment with buildings, and to develop prototypes for our new built environment.  We designers, engineers, architects, builders, and others will be creating our new built environment for the rest of our lives.  Lets have fun with this:  Enter the SHAC 10m2 Challenge! – due 20 August 2012.  [entry details…]

For example, energy is an important resource, and in New Zealand we presently use about 40% of our total personal energy for transport, 20% in the home and to produce our food, and 40% to produce the stuff we buy ( Scadden, p12 ). [Burning coal and oil in far-away, overseas factories].

Our new built environment will reduce our need for resources like water and energy by a number of methods.  Our judges will consider entries according to these points, from technical improvements to projects that inspire creativity and support people so that they have understanding, energy, and the will to create.  SHAC judges will take a wholistic approach in judging.

Judging Criteria

1) responding to a need

2) improving our knowledge, technical ability, and desire for durable, repairable stuff [from housing to cell phones], so that over time we have much less need to buy so much of it.  Teaching young people how to design, build, and maintain buildings and things is a great start!

3) stimulating and developing knowledge, awareness, and use of small quantities of valuable renewable electricty.

4) reducing the need for, and facilitating alternatives to private automotive travel

5) reducing the need for, and facilitating alternatives to regular business travel

6) Facilitating groups of people to get together to share ideas and create.

7) Stimulating the imagination and supporting groups of people to make progress on creating  an environmentally sound and socially just society.

8) Exhibiting a quality and care of construction that inspires others to support, promote  similar projects, and adapt and reuse your designs in future work.

F3 Artbox

  

F3 SiloStay

  

SHAC Awards 2012

  

May 2012 Awards
Rebuild and Reuse – for the Whole House Reuse project Juliet Arnott –
Design – F3 Design
Community Development  –   Joshua Durrant, Jess Smale, Sophie Moore
Micro and Temporary Architecture – Gapfiller
Commercialisation –  Danny Squires and Martin Luff  ThinkRadical.Net

On the 2-3 May 2012, SHAC presented the 2nd annual workshop on micro-architecture at the Christchurch Polytechnic Student Centre.  Sixty attendees discussed temporary architecture, simple buildings, and the reuse of building material.

“People cherish their culture through recycling” – those are the words of Wang Shu, the 2012 winner of the Pritzker architecture prize.  The demolition of red stickered housing and CBD buildings does not have to mean the eradication of Christchurch’s history or culture – nearly all materials can be reused in new construction, incorporating local memories and fusing the past with the present.

What is permanent in this land of earthquakes? In San Francisco, the Palace of Fine Arts was built in 1915 as a temporary building for the Panama-Pacific Exposition and still stands today as an icon of the city.  From the cardboard cathedral to the convention centre – how long will they serve us?

“Simple buildings are key for affordability” said Canadian architect Brian McKay Lyons, recently interviewed on Nine to Noon with Kim Hill.  Lyons, from Nova Scotia, says “simple buildings are what we farmers and fishermen build when we can’t afford to get things wrong”

SHAC Micro-Architecture Workshop 2-3 May 2012

Zero-Energy House

  

Zero-Modular House. This is a group work, members include David Wong, Jacky Lee, Praveen Karunasinghe and Biran He. We all had different tasks to utilize individual strengths in this group project. My responsibility was to research about solar panels, obstruction masks, and all presentation renders.

Since this is a tech paper, we had done a great amount of research on renewable resources, such as the minimum amount of solar panels needed to generate enough for the household.

>> Zero-Energy House.

GapFiller 10m2 SHAC

  

The Gap Filler temporary office
In December 2011, a team of young people got together with a vision to build an office for Gap Filler using materials saved from demolition sites around Christchurch. The team developed the design over the summer and with many talented volunteers built the office in a week in January!

The design and build was organised by SHAC in association with the Regeneration and White Elephant charitable trusts. Many skilled and unskilled volunteers helped out – builders, architects, engineers, young people and the occasional passer-by.

All of the building materials are reused, with the exception of building paper, insulation, chicken wire, fixings, clear plastic cladding and 4 sheets of thin treated plywood.

The office has an internal floor area of less than 10 square meters. Our talented designers and builders believe that the office complies with the building code, and is warm, stable, resistant to moisture, durable, and supports fire safety.

This office is experimenting with new building techniques. The east and southern wall structure are made from reused shipping pallets, a technology developed by Mark Fielding of Solabode Ltd in Nelson. The southern wall is clad with reused printing plates kindly donated by the Christchurch Press.

This tiny office will stay here for approximately 3 – 6 months. Power will come initially from neighbours and then, from solar power. Wireless internet access will come from a kind neighbour. Once we leave this site, the office will be relocated on a truck to another vacant site in Christchurch. The internal floor area is less than 10m2 and did not require a building consent.

We are using this land with the generous support of Ascot TV, who lost their building on this site in the earthquakes. They are now located at 300 Colombo Street, up the road.

What’s SHAC?
The Sustainable Habitat Challenge is a network of people designing and building more sustainable buildings and neighbourhoods. SHAC projects are educational in nature, teaching those involved new skills. The buildings they create are designed with non-profit group or charity in mind; in this case, Gap Filler. Gap Filler has been gifted this movable building which will be used as an office..

SHAC – affordable, delightful housing, micro architecture, simple building, and more… SHAC is about living well with less reliance on resources, and finding our purpose. See shac.org.nz for more info.

What’s Gap Filler?
Gap Filler is a creative urban regeneration initiative started in response to the September 4, 2010 Canterbury earthquake, and revised and expanded in light of the more destructive February 22, 2011 quake. It is now administered by the Gap Filler Charitable Trust. See gapfiller.org.nz for more info.

Gap Filler aims to temporarily activate vacant sites created by the quakes within Christchurch with creative projects for community benefit, to make for a more interesting, dynamic and vibrant city. Gap Filler has done a number of projects to date around Christchurch such as a book exchange, painted pianos, a community space and petanque pitch in Lyttelton, and outdoor events such as cinema and live music. Two projects have been completed in Sydenham recently, too – the outdoor chess set next to Honey Pot Café and Wayne Youle’s shadow board mural (working with Christchurch Art Gallery).

THANK YOU to: the landowners – ASCOT TV (especially Chris), Graham at ECO Framing, Barry Dowrick, CPIT and the Otago Polytechnic for the loan of many tools and Mark Fielding of Solabode Ltd in Nelson for the 5 prefab pallet walls and The Christchurch Press for the metal printing plates.

we thank you!

tim, clayton, barnaby, barry, lani, florian, ben, emma, ella, alice, amber, rachel, regan, felicity, alan, nick, seth, naomi, jules, the Australian group of young volunteers, ants, ann, nev, bob, dave, tarn, barry, darcy, Andrew, kyle, nastassja, Shayne, and kerry

Southern Demolition, Terra Lana Insulation, The Pumphouse [See Photo below], The Window Marketplace, Addington Demolition, Christchurch Demolition and Salvage, Clyne and Benny, Skelly Holdings, Dulux, Steel and Tube, White Elephant Trust and F3 Design, Solabode Ltd, Firth, and PSP

Office to rise from the rubble

  

One person’s rubble might be potential material for Gap Filler’s new office.

Sustainable Habitat Challenge (SHAC) and ReGeneration Trust New Zealand are collaborating to build an office for Gap Filler in Colombo St, Sydenham, with the help of volunteers and as many recycled or sustainable materials as possible.

Gap Filler project co-ordinator Coralie Winn said she was humbled by the plan.

“It’s a very generous gesture that they are doing this for us and also teaching young people building and design skills,” she said.

Gap Filler, which emerged after the September 2010 earthquake, has overseen several urban regeneration projects, such as the Lyttelton Petanque Club, the “book fridge” and the painted-piano project.

It has been based in Winn’s front room.

“Since November, we’ve hired a part-time helper, and people have been coming and going,” she said.

“It will be great to have an office that’s not at home. It would be quite nice to fill a gap with our own office.”

SHAC’s Tim Bishop said the frame of the 10-square-metre office would be built from recycled timber from demolished buildings, and the windows would also be recycled.

Waste polystyrene would be used for insulation, while the external walls would be constructed from wooden pallets usually used for transporting heavy goods.

“We want to show how to creatively reuse material left over from the earthquake. It’s a bit of a test. A few things are going to be new, like nails and building paper,” he said.

The project also aims to show young people that it can be easy and fun to build small buildings with sustainable materials.

Demolition and salvage yards, including Southern Demolition & Salvage, Musgroves and the Window Market Place, are also involved in the project.

The Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology is contributing equipment and helping to find a licensed builder.

The build will take a week, from January 23 to January 28.

Volunteers can sign up here.

 

via Office to rise from the rubble – the-press | Stuff.co.nz.

ReGenerating small, sustainable SHACs in the temporarily vacant sites of Christchurch

  

The ReGeneration Trust and SHAC (Sustainable Habitat Challenge) are keen to get rebuilding Christchurch. In January 2012, we’ll be running a six-day building project – starting from scratch, we’ll be working with builders, architects and a crew of young people to create a funky, recycled, moveable office for the Gap Filler project.

Gap Filler is a creative urban regeneration initiative that aims to temporarily activate vacant sites within Christchurch with creative projects, to make for a more interesting, dynamic and vibrant city. They’ve run a series of awesome projects, like the Lyttleton Petanque Club, Gap Filler Community Chess and the Think Differently Book Exchange.

We’ll be building an office for Gap Filler, using as many recycled and sustainable materials as we can. Our aim is to demonstrate that anyone can build and create, all it takes is some motivation and a few practical tools. We also want showcase the possibilities of holistic sustainability –
small, well insulated, water tight buildings made from a mixture of reused, recycled and sustainable materials.

ReGen and SHAC are now looking for motivated people who are willing to step up, represent and take practical action for positive change. The Christchurch 10m2 Building Project in an opportunity for creative, hands on types to work alongside experts on sustainable building, to learn new skills and share ideas for Christchurch in the future. We’ll be learning new skills each day and putting them into practice building walls, putting up roofs, cladding, internal lining, insulation and painting. And we’ll be documenting the process with stories, film and photographs.

If you’re a young person or a builder and you’re keen to be involved, get in touch! Email lani@regeneration.org.nz or tim@shac.org.nz

Happyzine » ReGenerating small, sustainable SHACs in the temporarily vacant sites of Christchurch.

Packing Crate Building

  

For more information, contact Mark Fielding at Ecotect

Micro Architecture Symposium 2011 Awards

  


SHAC Awards for 2011:

Speaker

Topic

Bruce Thompson

Experience building lightweight concrete infill construction for 15 years (egg cartons are not waste, they are a construction material) >>>

Liz Buxton

Designs from Sudan and Dunedin

Thomas Malpass

Simple buildings with trainee builders at Wintec in Hamilton

Andrew Just

A modular and very portable initiative designed to create a home for Christchurch artists, and a 15m2 accommodation unit built into a grain silo.  >>>

Michael Cambridge

Marlborough Housing Trust “Snug” – a high quality work space, bedroom or sauna using precut pine heartwood, and other European and North American examples. >>>

Chris and Ben

Developing and launching SPACE Moveable Rooms. Why we designed the way we did / transport constraints / commercial considerations / how the market is responding / new developments. >>>

Bomun Bock-Chung

Creating the best low cost, sustainable structures that are easy to build. >>>

Chris Moller

Developing a click-raft system and urban scale initiatives such as ‘city on a roof.  see click-raft.blogspot.com or click-raft.com  www.cityonaroof.net  www.hansafreehavens.net

Mark Fielding

Building homes using pallet frames, and other recycled waste materials in an effort towards marrying ecologically sustainability with affordability. >>>

Kevin Scally

UpDown Housing is a modular building system based on the design intelligence of early colonial buildings. They often started off as sheds and matured into houses. Inherent in their construction were features that made them easy to modify and recycle. UpDown Housing incorporated and extends this vernacular intelligence and design flexibility. This Cradle to Cradle system holds in trust the ecological investment in the building. The approach also anticipates the recycling, re-purposing and up-cycling of the modular components. Think Ikea and Mechano.  >>>

SHAC Symposium on Micro-Architecture, Simple Buildings, and Student Projects

  

Cost: $120 waged professionals / $40 students and others.
Date: Dunedin, 19-20th November, Registration on Saturday 9:00 – 16:00 / Sunday 9:00 – 15:00
Location: Ozone Lounge / Manaaki  / Otago Polytechnic / 51 Harbour Tce / Dunedin

Register Here >>>

How can today’s young people create their delightful and affordable homes and neighbourhoods?

This symposium brings together designers and builders who have figured out how to build a better way.

Let’s get to know each other.

Come for the weekend to the Otago Polytechnic to share your ideas and learn from local, national, and international innovative builders and designers.

SHAC Awards for 2011!

  • Commercialisation – Ben and Chris from SPACE MoveableRooms.co.nz
  • Practical Innovation – Michael Cambridge from Ecotect
  • Design – Andrew Just from CPIT and F3 Design
  • Pushing the Boundaries – Bomun Bock-Chung from Awhi Farms
  • Youth Participation and Supreme Awards – Thomas Malpass, Carpentry Tutor from Wintec

Speaker

Topic

Bruce Thompson

Experience building lightweight concrete infill construction for 15 years (egg cartons are not waste, they are a construction material) >>>

Liz Buxton

Designs from Sudan and Dunedin

Thomas Malpass

Simple buildings with trainee builders at Wintec in Hamilton

Andrew Just

A modular and very portable initiative designed to create a home for Christchurch artists, and a 15m2 accommodation unit built into a grain silo.  >>>

Michael Cambridge

Marlborough Housing Trust “Snug” – a high quality work space, bedroom or sauna using precut pine heartwood, and other European and North American examples. >>>

Chris and Ben

Developing and launching SPACE Moveable Rooms. Why we designed the way we did / transport constraints / commercial considerations / how the market is responding / new developments. >>>

Bomun Bock-Chung

Creating the best low cost, sustainable structures that are easy to build. >>>

Chris Moller

Developing a click-raft system and urban scale initiatives such as ‘city on a roof.  see click-raft.blogspot.com or click-raft.com  www.cityonaroof.net  www.hansafreehavens.net

Mark Fielding

Building homes using pallet frames, and other recycled waste materials in an effort towards marrying ecologically sustainability with affordability. >>>

Kevin Scally

UpDown Housing is a modular building system based on the design intelligence of early colonial buildings. They often started off as sheds and matured into houses. Inherent in their construction were features that made them easy to modify and recycle. UpDown Housing incorporated and extends this vernacular intelligence and design flexibility. This Cradle to Cradle system holds in trust the ecological investment in the building. The approach also anticipates the recycling, re-purposing and up-cycling of the modular components. Think Ikea and Mechano.  >>>

Incorporating the SHAC Awards for 2011!

Cost: $120 waged professionals / $40 students and others.

Date: Dunedin, 19-20th November

Location: Ozone Lounge / Manaaki  / Otago Polytechnic

51 Harbour Terrace / Dunedin (link to a map can be viewed here: http://goo.gl/UxaJG)
If you would like to share your work or ideas in the symposium, we are still receiving expression of interest so get back to us so we can organize a time for you to present. 8 minute and 20 minutes slots available.
Or if you would like to participate in the discussion you can register by following the link:

Register Here >>>

Country Conversion

  

When Matthew and Rebecca Taggat found a picturesque rural section in Raglan with a view to the Coast, it was love at first sight. The only problem was that they were not quite ready to build their “dream home”. The spot where they ultimately plan on building faces out to the nine acres of native bush that is part of their section, but for the interim, they decided a renovation was in order. A TotalSpan shed already on the site piqued their interest, and the renovation that ensued is testament to their creative vision from the beginning. At the time they embarked uponthe renovation, Rebecca was pregnant with
youngest daughter Ruby (now 10 months) and Milla was not yet one year old. Perhaps that was what spurred builder Daniel Klinkenberg of Urban Residential Developments Ltd into gear! From start to finish, Daniel took only three months to complete the transformation, and finished on the exact day he had specified in the contract. “We were
so impressed,” says Rebecca. “On the morning he finished, Daniel had cleaners in the house,and when he passed us the keys that afternoon, everything was perfect.”The revamped shed is still classified as an auxiliary building, to comply with local council regulations, and with that classification came some restrictions. The living area could be
no more than 70 square metres, plus three bedrooms and an office for Matthew. “There are some very clever design features,” says Rebecca. “For instance the roller door is still in place, kept high up and out of the way, but glass sliders in the same position really open the house up.” One thing that has changed drastically behind the scenes of the dwelling is the level of insulation. It had to be warm and healthy for the family of four, and the insulation instantly made the home more energy efficient. Rebecca and Matthew were pleased that Daniel put in “as much insulation as possible,” as well as double glazing
throughout. Another important part of the renovation was a new roof. The original was termed as a “shedding roof”, and the Taggarts wanted the safety of a residential grade alternative. To transform the shed into a home, extensive measures were taken, particularly across the front of the façade. “The whole face of the shed changed, but we stuck with iron on the other sides.” Cedar cladding softens the exterior, and Kwila decking helped to create an outdoor room. This is where the Taggart family spend most of their time in summer, in the sun and looking out toward the native bush.The interior is very light and
open, and belies the actual dimensionsof the home. A mainly white colour selection keeps each room spacious, as does the high pitch of the ceilings. Resene colour Alabaster is the shade throughout the house, with the ceilings in Resene Rice Cake. A soft Tasmanian Oak
floor also adds warmth, while keeping the feel light and airy.

MATERIALS

BEFORE & AFTER The former shed was once part of a large paddock in
which cows roamed, before it received
a comprehensive make-over to transform it into a family home.
FURNITURE Found on Trade Me, this feature chair adds a contemporary
feel with its modern patterned fabric.
KITCHEN HERB BOX In order to comply with local council regulations, a
recess had to be in place between the windowsill and the kitchen
bench. The result was a living herb garden, which fills the recess
perfectly.
FIRE With its radiant design the Metro H.T series wood burner is great
for heating open plan spaces. Finished
in metallic black high temperature paint, with a cooktop surface, this
fire is a great all rounder.

DIRECTORY

BUILDER
Urban Residential Developments Ltd
0275 397 005
www.urbanrd.co.nz
BATHROOMWARE
Michel Caesar www.michelcesar.co.nz
KITCHEN
Plain & Fancy Kitchens and Cabinets
07 847 4563
FIREPLACE
Metro Fires www.metrofires.co.nz
FLOOR BOARDS
Cedar Corp
0800 423 327
www.cedarcorp.co.nz
TILING
Brett Bateman Tiling
0800 4 47688

Homestyle, August/September, pg 52-56

 

Building work that does not require a building consent [DBH]

  

Detached buildings

Exemption (i) of Schedule 1

A building consent is not required for the following building work:

  • (i) building work in connection with any detached building (except a building that is required to be licensed in terms of the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996 or a building closer than its own height to any residential accommodation or to any legal boundary) that-
  • (i) houses fixed plant or machinery, the only normal visits to which are intermittent visits for routine inspection and maintenance of that plant or machinery; or
  • (ii) into which, or into the immediate vicinity of which, people cannot or do not normally go; or
  • (iii) is used only by people engaged in the construction or maintenance of another building for which a building consent is required; or
  • (iv) does not exceed 1 storey, does not exceed 10 square metres in floor area, and does not contain sanitary facilities or facilities for the storage of potable water, but may contain sleeping accommodation (without cooking facilities) if the detached building is used in connection with a dwelling.

via Building work that does not require a building consent.

EKOKIT – Modular homes from Ebode & Hybrid Homes

  

 

 

 

 

EKOKIT is a range of self-build eco houses that have been specifically designed to be flexible, sustainable and within the price reach of ordinary New Zealanders.

EKOKIT homes can be built anywhere in New Zealand, under the supervision of a Licensed Building Practitioner. If you don’t wish to manage your EKOKIT build yourself your EKOKIT is also available as a complete finished home through Planet Homes.

via EKOKIT – from Ebode & Hybrid Homes.

F3 Design’s ArtBox

  

 

 

 

 

ArtBox aims to provide exhibition and retail space for approximately 100 Christchurch artists, craft practitioners and design retailers who have lost workspace and outlets, through the creation flexible and portable modules, all of which have been locally designed and manufactured.

The project, instigated by CPIT in conjunction with Christchurch firm F3 Design, will begin with 18 modules being placed in and around the CPIT campus, with the hope that with the community’s support it can branch out to support a River of Arts throughout the city.

Pippin Wright-Stow, who co-owns F3 Design with his sister Ella, said the idea was spearheaded by F3 Design employee Andrew Just, who also lectures at CPIT’s architecture school.

The ArtBox modules are a 2.9m cube that allow for the creation of comfortable and highly adaptable spaces. They can be stacked, oriented and arranged in various practical configurations, insulated with wool, and are weather-tight. And because the modules are based around a steel hollow section frame, Wright-Stow said they have are very strong and have the ability to resist loads placed by earthquakes.

They’re not designed for one-off use either. Their unique design allows for multi-functional and multi-purpose use across a number of industries, from artists and jewellers to craftspeople and education institutions, as well as festivals and events.

“The idea is that they can be on-sold and used as commercial or residential dwellings,” said Wright-Stow.

Featuring interchangeable wall and flooring panels, the boxes can be placed on any surface, including concrete and grass.

via Architects and engineers collaborate in solution for displaced artists and designers